The brain that destroys itself

There’s a lot in the news these days about how the brain can cope with injury, rewiring and recovering using neuroplasticity – the ability of the brain to remodel itself.

If our brains are neuroplastic, then it seems to me that dementia is the opposite. It’s some kind of corrosive substance that eats away patches of the brain with random, impersonal cruelty. Faster then neuroplasticity can possibly manage.

How else can I explain that my mum tells me the same story, every time I see her, about her Dad sitting on a seat that didn’t even exist 30 years ago when he died?

That it is fixed in her head that there is a swimming pool in a nearby property because it had a “Danger, Swimming pool under construction” sign on it for a few months several years ago, when they were digging out the underground garage. The house has been finished for a long time, but the fictitious swimming pool remains front and centre in what’s left of her brain.

Me, though… I am gone. Well mostly gone. She knows she knows me – today, wonder of wonders, she even knew my name, which is rare – but she asked me if I knew her children: Sally, Jane, and Kerrie.

When I arrived at her place she told me she wouldn’t be living there much longer. I asked her where she would go, and she said she had parents nearby.

A bit later she told me her parents had died and that’s why she was living alone. I don’t know if she remembers my Dad at all. I didn’t have the heart to ask. Anyway, it changes from moment to moment.

Why does the swimming pool stick in her head, when I am gone? It’s not long term and short term, or early memories vs late. It’s far more random than that.

We went to Red Brick, as usual, and Chris and Bruce were lovely. I don’t know how I would survive these visits if it weren’t for them. Within the space of a few minutes she said she hadn’t been there for years, and that she goes there often.

As the visit went on and she bounced back and forth through time like a confused pinball, I think Chris could see I was struggling. When he brought me my coffee he gave me a pat on the back that nearly broke me. Sometimes when you’re only barely keeping it together, someone being nice to you can tip you over the edge, have you noticed that?

She is deaf as a post and doesn’t hear one word in five, but it doesn’t matter because the words she does hear mostly don’t make sense to her. She has got to the point where she tends to fill in the conversation in her own head a lot of the time, which is almost restful. I try to let it all wash over me but it breaks my heart and pulverises my brain. Being with her is devastating and exhausting, and I feel as though I am losing myself in her frantic confusion.

Mum doesn’t see me anymore, whether I am there or not. And maybe it shouldn’t matter. Even before dementia took her away, she never saw me clearly. I was never who she wanted me to be. Maybe now I am easier for her to accept. As for me, I struggle to wrap my head around this new reality. My mum is dead, and I don’t know what to make of the stranger who inhabits her skin. She is dead, yet she dies a little more every day. How do you process that?

Sometimes Mum peers through the fragments of her personality and I can tell she is terrified by what’s happening to her. When I leave, she says fearfully “I didn’t do anything wrong, did I?”

I reassure her as best I can, and I cry all the way home.

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3 thoughts on “The brain that destroys itself

  1. Sigh. Going through this now with my mother-in-law. Went through it with my mom. Praying that my daughter won’t have to go through it with me. You are not alone. I think grieving a person with dementia is too confounding for words. It’s an ongoing process while they’re alive (or semi-alive), and a whole different thing after they’re not.

  2. Arjen

    Such a pity, and deafness on top of that. It’s hard.
    With my mum we tried playing music – particular music that she knows well. And my goodness the effects were quick and amazing. We had a sensible conversation about things she wasn’t remembering even earlier that day. The effect is not permanent, but playing music is easy medicine!
    Possibly with your mum you can try and find music that has a familiar rhythm and can be felt when holding on to the speaker as well… just an idea, it’s easily tried and harmless.

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